Pre 195CC purchase questions

JeffQ

Registered Member
State
WI
Hello all,
Just joined the forum since considering the purchase of a Triumph. I like the 195CC but am wondering for those of you that have one do you find the small amount of room behind the helm seat an issue?

Also, the majority of used boats I see for sale have a 115 for power. If I take it off shore should I have a 150?

Thank you...Jeff
 

Harper

Recognized Leader Triumph 191/195 Forum
Lifetime Member
Premium Member
City
Republic of Texas
Not sure what you are looking for in the way of space behind the helm seats, since most center console layouts on a given sized boat are going to be much the same as far as space goes. The livewell/baitwell is directly behind the seats, but takes up a little less than a foot. Most of my fishing is done from the helm seating and from there it's easy to fish off either one side or off the stern. So I don't find it to be an issue at all.

As to engine size, the 115 is probably adequate for offshore excursions, but the 150 HP is definitely advisable. My 195CC is powered by a Suzuki DF150. The boat is a 2008 model, and is one of the few that has a plaque indicating a max HP of 175. Most 195s are rated at 150 HP max. As far as I'm concerned, for offshore work, the bigger, the better.

I think you'll like the 195CC. It's pretty versatile, can be poled into fairly shallow water (14" draft), and does equally well inshore to near offshore. I've gone as far a 20 miles out, but unless the waters are moderately calm, it takes a long time to get out that far. In 2' seas I can comfortably travel between 15 and 20 mph.
 

Dave_L1

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Member
Premium Member
City
Pine Island
State
Florida

Offshoreman

Recognized Leader Triumph 235 Forum
Lifetime Member
Premium Member
City
North Coast
State
CA
I recommend 150 hp. But go new, or newer if you can. Newer ones can be lighter and are more fuel efficient. And having the greater power (vs the 115) would be nice.

However, run what it has for a while and see how happy you are before you spend the big $$'s.

My 235 is rated for 300, and it has a 250 on it. Wish I had the 300, but not going to spend until it NEEDS a repower.
 

j5moto

Registered Member
State
Ca
I've owned my 2006 195 CC with a F115TXR for a few months now. I've taken it out to Catalina and circumnavigated the whole island. Over 100 miles per trip on half my trips now. In a way, I feel the same as I did with my previous Klamath 16 footer...which had a 40hp but could take a 60hp. It's rare that I can use that much power because swell and chop force you to slow down anyway.

Granted, I can now go much faster in my Triumph. In calm enough water I will top out just over 30mph. At 4200 rpm I will get just over 20mph, and at 4600-4800, I will be going 25mph. Now, my trip average mpg are around 3.75 mpg, which has slow speeds, high speeds (sometimes), and drifting in idle included.

I've read the 150 might get better mpg at cruise speed since it might be able to do the same speed at lower rpm. Haven't seen anything conclusive since I've been reading and owning in the last 3 months. But, like I said, it'd be rare that I am actually trying to do better than 25mph on the water...even if I could, I'd be going slower to conserve gas and save a few bucks.
 

Dave_L1

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Member
Premium Member
City
Pine Island
State
Florida
The 150 would be what I would hang on her when needed, which would then allow you to spin a larger prop. Most all of these engines give you their best fuel burn rate a 4000 RPM. Once you start to go over 4500 you start burning a lot more fuel at a quickly increasing GPH rate.

I had a fuel burn gauge (GPH) on my last Triumph 190 that had a 150 Honda mounted on a jack plate, lower water pick up engine nose cone, hotter range spark plugs, BMS Stabilizer plate, etc. and trust me, for a 190 she would just fly... But more important than all of that, she was very fuel efficient since I could trim her out using the GPH burn numbers to "fine tune" engine position, trim, etc. So much so, that her final over all average GPH was around 2 GPH which was great :cool:

These reason I say this, is no matter which engine brand you go with (or stay with now) they for the most part are all good engines... I would stick to the Max HP rating at upgrade time since it will not work as hard as one of less output.

But also get a gauge package that includes fuel burn / fuel flow as one of the display options. And I suspect, you could add it to your present engine and keep a eye on it in all running conditions and speeds. It will save you money in the long run ;)

yamaha-comm-speed-fuel1.jpg


Hope this helps?
Dave
 

Offshoreman

Recognized Leader Triumph 235 Forum
Lifetime Member
Premium Member
City
North Coast
State
CA
I completely agree. Max horsepower rating is your best place to go. And no matter which modern outboard you go with, pair it with a modern multifunction display so that you can get all of the data points out of the engine onto a display. And that will include oil pressure and temperature, voltage and amperage output, and gallons per hour, miles per gallon, fuel remaining in the tank as you run, and all of that will give you a sense of how far you can go and when your turn around point is for coming home. It's nice to be able to see all the data points from your engine.

I have done that with every boat I've had from Outboards, inboard diesels, and an inboard outboard diesel.

There's a lot of talk and conjecture about which outboard is the best for your boat, and that going larger saves you Fuel. And that's not always the case. I think going up marginally from 115 to 150, will give you that desired result. For me, up on the North Coast of California, the greater horsepower gives me the confidence to safely navigate home when conditions turn bad.

I always wished I had a 200 on the back of my 215 center console, but my 150 did just fine.

On my 235cc, I'm not certain how much fuel I would save by going from 250 up to 300, in fact, sometimes I believe I would probably spend a little more fuel with a 300. But I know that I would have more than sufficient power to get me back into the harbor safe.

Just something else to think about.
 

Offshoreman

Recognized Leader Triumph 235 Forum
Lifetime Member
Premium Member
City
North Coast
State
CA
I am a Yamaha fan. When I bought my current boat, it had a 250 Suzuki on the back. I was skeptical at first, as I simply wanted the boat and didn't care which outboard it had. But now that I have it, I am very happy with Suzuki.

No doubt 4-stroke is the only way to go these days. Yamaha, Suzuki, Mercury, Evinrude (if you want to deal with on-board fuel tank and running a two-stroke), though they are very clean and quiet these days. Honda makes a good engine. Even Tohatsu is simply a generically badged Honda.

I think the biggest points in deciding on which outboard eventually to go with are your max horsepower rating, and what the sales, service and warranty situation is in your area. If there aren't any Suzuki dealers anywhere near you, go with a different brand. Something that will support you locally.
 

Maxg94

Participating Member
Premium Member
City
Middle River
I have the Honda 135 and it works fine. Trolls good still, max speed 40MPH GPS and can get up on plane with 8 people still. It really depends on how much weight. With just a couple of people 115 should be fine. If I were buying I would go with the max HP.
 

Offshoreman

Recognized Leader Triumph 235 Forum
Lifetime Member
Premium Member
City
North Coast
State
CA
The discussion about max hp rating, in my opinion and experience, is less about max speed and more about enough power to handle bad situations when they arise. I'm never anywhere but offshore. In the bay only long enough to get to open water. So, I know about not being able to speed across the water, which is never, usually never an option.

But, having the power at hand to get you along in a following sea with a load, or through an inlet on an opposing tide, is very important.

More power also allows the handling of the boat at fewer RPM's, which CAN relate to better economy. But if we were all so concerned about economy, many of us would not own boats!
 

Offshoreman

Recognized Leader Triumph 235 Forum
Lifetime Member
Premium Member
City
North Coast
State
CA
I say run it until it needs a repower. You'll probably be happy enough until then. Then make decisions based on past performance and future needs or wants.

Quite a few boats run offshore here in Northern California with 115's. My neighbor has a Whaler with a 90, and he frequently runs far offshore for tuna.
 

Harper

Recognized Leader Triumph 191/195 Forum
Lifetime Member
Premium Member
City
Republic of Texas
Just had the chance to read Offshoreman's post above about power for offshore work. He makes a very good point, and it was also my point, but mine was not as well stated. When I said, "As far as I'm concerned, for offshore work, the bigger, the better," having adequate power for those tricky offshore situations is exactly why you'd better have the power when you need it. I have no compunctions about going out in 4-6' seas in our 19' boats, but it can be "exciting" in such seas coming into the channel when the tide is rushing out.
 

Dave_L1

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Member
Premium Member
City
Pine Island
State
Florida
Option B

Run with what you have till it dies, and invest in a Flats Jack for the engine. By getting the lower unit drag out of the water while running, you will increase in speed and burn the same or less fuel at the same time :)

Hope this helps?
Dave
 
Top